Plain language resources

Drawing together the best plain language resources from Australia and overseas into one location – research, guidelines and practical advice.

The foundation's list of plain language resources is broken up into activities to help you find what you are looking for. Search for a particular topic by keyword or filter by activity. The resources include a range of historical materials that were influential in the development of plain language, particularly in Australia.

Please note that, apart from Victoria Law Foundation resources, all resources are held on external websites.

We have developed a guide on how we have grouped the resources to make it easier for you to use them.

591 resources
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Research and journals

Can plain language change our approach to conflict

Presented at Clarity2016. Plain language offers the revolutionary potential to change the way society understands conflict. Shifting from legal expertise in solving disputes to citizen's management of everyday interactions will minimize the anxiety, cost and consequences of legal issues.

As a component of Preventative Lawyering, lawyers who use plain language in their relationships with clients, break down the intimidation and confusion that legal terminology causes. Building the capacity of clients to understand and confidently participate in legal issues, lawyers empower people to take early, simple steps to reduce conflict and remove the fear and shame of legal disputes.

Sharing knowledge of legal terms and processes has the potential to bring clients into an active conversation about legal resolution. Shifts in medical and financial practice have transformed the expert-client relationship into a decision-making partnership. Law has not yet seen the same sharing of expertise. Plain language principles in all client communication would empower people to be active in their legal disputes, pursuing early resolution.

Sharing control of the language of law could transform the way society talks about conflict, opening up new possibilities for resolution.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

What's your prison?

Presented at Clarity2016. Dr Paul Wood is an expert in helping people overcome the barriers that hold them back from being the best versions of themselves and advocating for what they passionately believe in.

Paul will be using his own journey from delinquent to doctor to illustrate the universal steps involved in overcoming adversity and reaching our potential. This will involve looking at the power of clarity of purpose, literacy, and choice in our lives. Paul's story will leave you certain of our ability to strive for excellence and make a difference, regardless of your circumstances.

Paul’s presentation style is dynamic, humorous, and deeply authentic. His presentation will leave you with a better understanding of how to become the best version possible of yourself — and how to help others do the same.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Breaking the legalese barrier

Presented at Clarity2016. A roundtable discussion at PLAIN’s Vancouver conference inspired me to continue to explore why law students who are taught to use plain language are so eager to use legalese as soon as they are in practice (or before). My research has uncovered a variety of subtle and not-so-subtle influences that keep the plain-language community from making more progress, especially with new lawyers and other new professionals. This session explores those influences, introduces a variety of strategies to overcome them, and invites participants to strategize about their own solutions. The session will draw on research in our own field, as well as research in psychology, rhetoric, consumer behavior, and other areas.

Delegates will get an understanding of why people entering a new profession are so committed to using legalese or similar profession-specific jargon. Armed with this understanding, delegates will learn about strategies to overcome these barriers. Finally, delegates will have the opportunity to brainstorm about other strategies that might be effective in more specialized situations.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Plain language in the public sector

Presented at Clarity2016. Presented by Neil James. Ever wondered if the government in your country is a trailblazer or a laggard when it comes to plain language? A major new international project aims to find out.

The Plain International Survey will regularly assess how governments around the world are implementing plain language and how citizens view their success. It will use a staged approach over the next three years to fill a major gap in our knowledge about plain language internationally.

What this plenary session will cover
Sandra’s session (presented by Dr Neil James) will:

  • outline the survey’s scope and method
  • outline how the project will develop
  • provide initial findings from a pilot survey involving four countries.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Addressing systematic complexity: or how to achieve sustainable clarity, once and for all

Presented at Clarity2016. While we suffer incomprehensibility one document (or web screen) at a time, most complexity problems are ‘systemic’ in nature. Effective solutions must therefore address systemic, macro issues if the clarity sought in individual documents is to be sustained across an organization and over time. Charlene Haykel has developed such a process. Macrosimplification™ applies the principles and techniques for simplifying a single document to hundreds of such documents or screen pages across product and division lines of large organizations. Macrosimplification™ builds leaner, more effective communications around core content, typically reducing content volume by 20–30%. It also achieves sustainable clarity by tackling, head-on, organizational issues of staffing, training, culture and cost. Haykel will use case studies to show how a 20–30% reduction in word count consistently results in more manageable, clear and comprehensible, and cost-effective communications. She will lead delegates through a discussion of the practical challenges of improving language and content access at their companies and agencies. She’ll show them how, when dealt with on a macro level, communications can be clarified once and for all.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

To trust or not to trust

Presented at Clarity2016. Who do we listen to for advice and guidance when we need it? In a personality-driven culture, we might assume that assertive and dominant people are the most persuasive among us. However, you don’t need to be the loudest person in the room to convince people that what you have to say is worth listening to. So what is an alternative approach? Maybe the first and most important question we need to ask is: how do we engender trust in an audience? In this session, we’ll unpack the idea of trust and see how it can help us to communicate compelling and powerful messages to friends, colleagues, and audiences.

A coach in the art of powerful speech making and writing, Zane offers a fresh perspective on advocating for plain language. If you’ve ever had to deal with colleagues who don’t care, are openly negative, or who see a push for clarity as a nice-to-have, you’ll leave this session primed for success.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

The public speak, again: A sneak preview of an new international study

Presented at Clarity2016. Have you ever wished you had evidence on how the public perceives legal communication in your country? If so, then this session is for you. You’ll be among the first to see new empirical evidence discussing what the public wants when they read legal information. This new study, which is a follow-up to The Public Speaks: An Empirical Study of Legal Communication, targets responses from the U.S., the U.K., Canada, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. The study will gather data on such things as using legal terms of art, overusing jargon, and many other hallmarks of traditional legal language. This data will then be compared by and between countries, which will provide much needed evidence to support Clarity’s mission. Come find out what we can learn from this new evidence.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Why 21st century consumer policy need plain language

Presented at Clarity2016. The modern push for plain language emerged from the consumer rights movements of the 1970s. Since then, technological advances and intensified competition have dramatically transformed the consumer landscape, with consumers today faced with a wide and often bewildering array of complex products and services.

As complexity has grown, the emphasis in consumer policy has shifted away from prescriptive regulation and market intervention in favour of consumer information and education approaches. And most recently, the emerging discipline of behavioural economics has drawn attention not only to the critical role of information, but also to the subtleties of how it's provided and to the pitfalls of information overload.

What can plain language practitioners contribute to the central goals of 21st century consumer policy: consumers who know their rights and are equipped to make good decisions? How do we frame our work in a way that resonates with policymakers? And what must governments and plain language advocates alike remember about the limits of information as a policy tool — particularly for vulnerable consumers?

Using real-world examples from telecommunications, utilities and the financial services, this presentation will draw out the relevance of consumer policy trends for plain language practitioners and advocates.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Eliminating the Yeah Nahs: Keeping it clear for an audience new to New Zealand

Presented at Clarity2016. Moving to live and work in a new country involves finding out a great deal of information that locals simply take for granted. New Zealand organisations are very good at providing that information, however the information provided is not always written or presented in the most user friendly way.

Keeping it Clear – a new guide written and produced by Immigration New Zealand - aims to address this by providing organisations with tips to follow when they are communicating with people new to New Zealand.

Tips include keeping language short and simple, active and direct and avoiding idioms and ‘kiwi-isms’ that newcomers may not understand.

We don’t realise that there are more than 25,000 idioms in the English language and we liberally scatter them through most information. These are extremely difficult for new speakers of English to understand.

They can be the difference between a newcomer acting on information or ignoring it.

Even the Kiwi expressions that we think nothing of, such as “bring a plate”, “box of birds” or “across the ditch” can have migrants, even from other English speaking countries, scratching their heads in confusion. Yeah, Nah… Absolutely!

This session will introduce delegates to the guide and cover off some of the more important tips.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

How to create an effective digital strategy for your legal information

Presented at Clarity2016. For most legal organisations, websites play a critical role in providing legal information to their users. But websites need to be supported by effective digital strategies to engage with their intended audience. To promote greater legal literacy and raise awareness of legal issues, organisations should consider how audiences engage with information in a range of formats and digital channels. This will make it more likely that organisations reach and motivate their target audiences. This presentation uses Everyday-Law.org.au as an example to provide an introduction to digital strategy and its distinctive advantages for explaining the law to the general public.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

The necessity of plain language for the 'New Jurist'

Presented at Clarity2016. Lawyers have great skills: knowledge, rigour, eloquence, etc. They have traditionally fostered a hierarchical relationship with their clients by providing expert knowledge difficult, if not impossible, to assess by laypeople. At the same time, in North America, trials are vanishing. Costs are too high, delays too long, processes too complex. Increasing numbers of citizens go to trial without counsel. They question relations of authority in all areas of society. They are better educated and have access to more information. They do not want to be told what to do.

In this context, lawyers need to add to their classical skills by fostering relations of partnership and collaboration with their clients. Plain language in law is one essential skill required of legal counsels to convey the rules of law, thus making it possible for clients to make their own informed decisions.

How is plain language essential to students of law and lawyers? Why do judges need to adopt plain language when addressing parties? How is the legal profession to adapt to these social changes, if not, by making law more accessible? How can plain language adepts convince colleagues of the importance of communicating law clearly and effectively?

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

How quant studies can work with qualitative development projects

Presented at Clarity2016. The U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's development of the application and closing mortgage disclosures relied on several rounds of qualitative interview sessions across geographically dispersed sites. The final product achieved excellent results with participants being able to make sophisticated tradeoffs, even with highly complex products. To validate these qualitative results, a quantitative study compared performance on 4 dimensions: 1. Consumers (experienced vs. inexperienced borrowers); 2. Loan Type: (fixed rate vs, Adjustable rate);  3. Difficulty (easy vs. complicated loans); and 4.Disclosure (current vs.  proposed). This presentation will discuss the results in each major category and how one predicted issue resulted in one major change in the proposed disclosure.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

People first language: creating clarity for people with disabilities

Presented at Clarity2016. Information accessibility and inclusiveness is at the heart of plain language. Yet for people with disabilities, the language used to communicate about and with them often fails to uphold these important communication traits. In this presentation, we will introduce what people-first language is and show why it matters for creating clarity and inclusiveness. We’ll illustrate how people-first language aligns with international plain language standards and provide tips for using this writing technique.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Beyond all reasonable doubt: the marketing advantages of plain English insurance and banking contracts

Presented at Clarity2016. On meeting a stranger we have one fundamental question – are they friend or foe? And everything that follows is based on the decision we make.

For this reason, insurers, banks and financial planners need to avoid an overture to potential customers that creates suspicion. These interactions ­are generally characterised by obfuscation and, therefore, confusion, and lead to misunderstandings and misplaced customer expectations.

Obscure language promotes doubt, and doubt leads to hesitation and fear of engagement, which, in turn, creates suspicion. If you accept that trust is the most valuable brand asset any insurer, bank or financial planner can own then the marketing case for plain English contracts is self-evident. After all, it takes years for a brand to build trust but only a whiff of suspicion to erode it.

Plain English consumer contracts present information that people can understand and act on with confidence. They can put your brand beyond all reasonable doubt and, therefore, beyond the mortal threat that suspicion poses.

Drawing on his 15 years of experience as a plain English editor and writer, and using real examples of his recent work with Australia’s biggest banks, insurance companies and financial institutions like CGU Insurance and NAB, Andrew Pegler will present the compelling marketing case for plain English contracts.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Beyond all reasonable doubt: the marketing advantages of plain English insurance and banking contracts

Presented at Clarity2016. On meeting a stranger we have one fundamental question – are they friend or foe? And everything that follows is based on the decision we make.

For this reason, insurers, banks and financial planners need to avoid an overture to potential customers that creates suspicion. These interactions ­are generally characterised by obfuscation and, therefore, confusion, and lead to misunderstandings and misplaced customer expectations.

Obscure language promotes doubt, and doubt leads to hesitation and fear of engagement, which, in turn, creates suspicion. If you accept that trust is the most valuable brand asset any insurer, bank or financial planner can own then the marketing case for plain English contracts is self-evident. After all, it takes years for a brand to build trust but only a whiff of suspicion to erode it.

Plain English consumer contracts present information that people can understand and act on with confidence. They can put your brand beyond all reasonable doubt and, therefore, beyond the mortal threat that suspicion poses.

Drawing on his 15 years of experience as a plain English editor and writer, and using real examples of his recent work with Australia’s biggest banks, insurance companies and financial institutions like CGU Insurance and NAB, Andrew Pegler will present the compelling marketing case for plain English contracts.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

What if there was a revolution and no one knew about it: Exploring the disconnect between plain laws and plain language

Presented at Clarity2016. Laws are among the most complex legal documents known to humankind. If they could be written in plain language, then there would be no reason why all legal documents couldn’t be written in plain language. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the first laws that were deliberately written as plain language laws. The Government that wrote them is still writing all of its laws in plain language, as now are many other Governments. Yet in legal writing generally, plain language is still the exception, rather than the rule, and is still a matter of controversy. How can this be? This session will explore the history of the use of plain language in laws, and the lessons that that history provides for the use of plain language generally.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

How to teach plain language writing to law students

Presented at Clarity2016. Going to university involves challenges for students as they are educated within a specialised academic community. They need to understand the key strategies to become part of that community, and be able to produce academic writing.

At the same time, this process — academic literacy — will allow them to be part of a scientific and professional community in the future (Radloff and de la Harpe, 2000). For this reason, many universities around the world have introduced writing programmes and workshops, understanding that teaching them to write specialised texts is essential.

In 2011, the Faculty of Law at the Catholic University of Valparaiso, Chile (PUCV) included four compulsory courses in linguistic skills, called ‘Strategies’. These courses are offered during the first four years of the programme, and one of them is ‘Strategies for producing a written discourse’. The course primarily aims to teach students to develop strategies for writing clear text that can be understood by the varied audiences they will encounter as lawyers.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

With a little help from my friends: Politicians, laws and rock and roll - changing the Norwegian law-making process

Presented at Clarity2016. Norwegian citizens have too long tacitly accepted legalese, a language preventing understanding and participation. In our experience the process of changing the language in laws, can be compared to the long winters in Norway. The process is hard, snowy, slippery, but also fun and filled with speed and excitement. In this session you will meet two unorthodox bureaucrats who have willingly taken the mission of fighting the fog. In short, as we say in Norway, we have made snowballs roll. Our presentation is based on five years ofwork with the Clear Law Project in Central Government. We are delighted to share our experience in developing clarity in Norwegian laws. It's all about persistency, persuasion and transformation.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Crystal clear e-services: Behind the scenes

Presented at Clarity2016. Each year the Language Council of Sweden awards a prize, the Plain Swedish Crystal, to a public authority or a local municipality for its plain language efforts. Each year’s Crystal has a different theme. In 2016 the theme was “plain language in e-services”. Of course, an e-service must be well-functioning technically. But it is also important that the keywords are consistent and that the instructions are comprehensible to the user. Buttons, arrows and other symbols must be clear, and the tone must be friendly. Looking through processes behind the services nominated for this year’s Crystal, we found several key factors that were common to them all:

  • Focus on the users´ needs
  • Knowledge from earlier experiences about what users find difficult
  • Close co-operation between experts, lawyers, writers, and developers
  • Short texts – only the necessary content
  • Consistent and plain terminology

This presentation will show you examples from three successful e-services, and look into the work behind them. After the presentation you are invited to discuss best practices for comprehensive and clear e-services.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Acquisition and government contracts

Presented at Clarity2016. One of the last frontiers of plain language in the US federal government is acquisition/procurement language.
Many agencies have made great strides in changing their language: lawyers, tax correspondence, health information, and benefits. However, contracts — and people who deal with them to buy products, services, and solutions to carry out their agency’s mission — are rarely in plain language.

People make the usual arguments: the lawyers blessed it, it worked last time, we can’t change things, and people are used to it.

But to make it easier for customers, one agency — the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) — did. Staff looked at a regularly reported pain point: the instructions to suppliers on how to sell information technology to other federal agencies, and decided they could do better.

The results? The Making it Easier Initiative and the Schedule 70 Roadmap, both on GSA.gov.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Labours of Hercules: improving clarity at the Australian Taxation Office

Presented at Clarity2016. In this session, I’ll talk about my experiences of trying to help the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) to improve our legal writing. I’ve been working on it since 2006 in a number of different ways, and have had a lot of opportunities to observe what not to do. We’re now trying to apply some of what we’ve learned to approach the task differently. I’m going to talk a little about the various obstacles, systemic problems, and other hindrances we’ve faced over the years. Then, looking forward and drawing from those experiences, I’ll outline how our new approach deals creatively with some of these seemingly impossible labours – without the need for herculean strength or huge resources. Anyone interested in improving technical writing in an organisational setting will find much to relate to, and may also get some fresh ideas to try in their organisations.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Demonstrate leadership in plain language: Commission clearly

Presented at Clarity2016. Clear commissions, or briefs, are your chance to demonstrate leadership, by giving writers direction.

Taking the time to commission writers tells them you are serious about plain English, and that you expect them to write the best possible document for your readers. Over time, you’ll see writers develop more skill and confidence because they know what is expected of them.

This speed learning session will show you how to use your knowledge and expertise to commission effectively.

  • You’ll review a commissioning model built on the principles of plain English.
  • You’ll consider what you need to add or change to make the model work for you and the writers you commission.
  • You’ll think about how much time you can save when you no longer have to rewrite documents.
  • You’ll see how a commission helps with feedback, peer review, and quality assurance.

Published: 2016

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Research and journals

Designing a statute book for the 21st century

Presented at Clarity2016. Most of New Zealand’s legislation was made available on the NZ Legislation website in 2008. Our goal of making legislation accessible to all was finally realised! Or so we thought.

We now know that was just the beginning. Access is more than simply being able to obtain a copy of legislation, or writing it using plain language. Legislation is no longer the domain of experts. Today, anyone who has access to the Internet can use it. We need to make legislation available in a way that meets the needs and expectations of those users, and reflects their understanding of it.

The shift to online legislation provides an opportunity to consider what effective communication means when we take advantage of today’s technology, and plan for tomorrow’s.

This session will focus on:

  • the opportunities that are available when legislation is viewed as an electronic data-set, rather than words printed in a series of books:
  • methods for communicating information to people who do not know they need it:
  • how we can simplify a vast, complex, and interrelated statute book:
  • the Access to Subordinate Instruments Project (http://www.pco.parliament.govt.nz/asip/):
  • how more effective communication and better document design may lead to better legislative outcomes.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

Clarity in legal language in English: Is it possible?

Presented at Clarity2016. In this address, Michael Kirby, International Patron Of Clarity, will explore the effort to inject greater clarity into the notoriously troublesome area of legal prose, including the text of legislation and the language of judicial reasons. He will suggest some of the explanations for complexity. The basic explanation is the dual character of the English language. We speak as our Anglo-Saxon ancestors did in a Germanic tongue. But we write as the clerks to the Norman Kings wrote in a Franco-Latin way. This difference between the language of the kitchen and of the office or courthouse lies at the heart of the often needless complexity of official English. Getting lawyers to write simply and clearly involves the observance of a few simple rules. These rules should be taught in legal offices, law school lecture rooms and government departments. The urgency of embracing clear English is enhanced by the advent of word processors and computerised precedents. Heaven forbid that we should be stuck for centuries with obscure precedents immortalised by computer technology. So the challenge is urgent and important. Clarity International plays a vital role in promoting the use of clear language. It is a global challenge. It affects all languages everywhere. But none more than the English language, with its unique history and global coverage.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

An advocate for plain language

Presented at Clarity2016. When Una Jagose, Solicitor-General, began practice as a lawyer the Acts Interpretation Act urged:

“Every Act, and every provision or enactment thereof, shall be deemed remedial, whether its immediate purport is to direct the doing of anything Parliament deems to be for the public good, or to prevent or punish the doing of anything it deems contrary to the public good, and shall accordingly receive such fair, large, and liberal construction and interpretation as will best ensure the attainment of the object of the Act and of such provision or enactment according to its true intent, meaning, and spirit”

Now, the Interpretation Act says:

“The meaning of an enactment must be ascertained from its text and in the light of its purpose.”

The NZ statute book is being overhauled in favour of plain language. Have other parts of the legal system followed suit? Una will outline her ambition for clarity as Government’s chief advocate and adviser and chief executive of Crown Law.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

Poacher turned gamekeeper

Presented at Clarity2016. David’s presentation is based on the absolute importance of taking a plain English approach to even the most complicated aspects of long-term saving and investing. Using KiwiSaver and his experience in the funds management industry, he’ll show how far the industry has come in its approach. He’ll challenge the industry even further in the areas that will help to improve New Zealanders’ overall financial wellbeing.  He’ll also put the spotlight on changes to the Sorted website and highlight the unique ways that have been developed to connect with people of all levels of investor capability.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

Listenability and the law

Presented at Clarity2016. The value of effective communication is well recognised in the provision of written information about the law and its mechanisms. So is the importance of procedural fairness, including perceptions by court users that they have been treated with respect. Less well understood in the Australian context is the role that verbal communication plays - not only in the experience of its users, but their ability to comply with the law. Drawing on a range of Centre for Innovative Justice (CIJ) projects, Director Rob Hulls will highlight lessons from work to increase compliance with family violence protection orders, as well as research regarding the experiences of criminal justice system users with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). Exploring common themes, Rob will highlight the way in which ‘listenability’ has a crucial role when compliance with the law is involved. Going beyond comprehension to communication which mitigates the effects of stress and other impairment, ‘listenability’ becomes vital to access to justice and community safety. Outlining findings from further research in this area, the CIJ will seek to use this work to help users of the justice system navigate its complexities and comply more effectively with the law.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

Modernising Construction Contracts

Presented at Clarity2016. Whether renovating a home or building a bridge, the client and builder need a construction contract. Typically these are based on published standard forms written in legalese and administered by construction professionals. None of these parties are normally legally qualified. Research shows it is not only possible to write construction contracts in plain language without losing legal intent, but that it is necessary to do so.

Among an exception to contracts written in legalese is the Standard Terms of Construction Contract for Renovation and Small Projects (STCC – RSP 2015) published by the Construction Industry Development Board Malaysia. Two case studies are presented to explain how research on modern legal drafting led to the drafting and implementation of this contract in two projects - one each in Malaysia and New Zealand.

The contract adopts a user-friendly project management structure and other plain legal drafting principles such as omitting redundant legalese and doublets, avoiding multiple cross referencing, and using gender-neutral language without the cumbersome she, he, or it. It was endorsed by professional bodies in Malaysia and accredited as a Clear English Standard document by the Plain Language Commission, United Kingdom.

Following a Malay translation, it is now being considered as a model to be modified to suit other jurisdictions.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

Quantifying the cost of confusion

Presented at Clarity2016. "It’s the greatest expense you don't know you have". http://www.rswarren.com/index2.php (accessed 08/24/2016)

How often do you have to deal with confusion in your workplace?

Confusion is found in legislation, websites, emails, utility bills and payslips. It drains resources and productivity. Knowing the cost is a starting point for tackling the often hidden (and accepted) problem of confusion.

You will learn how confusion creates variance in an organisation resulting in missed targets.

This interactive workshop will discuss common causes as well as the effects of confusion. A methodology for quantifying the cost of confusion in the workplace will be presented. Given a specific scenario, you will have the opportunity of calculating the cost of confusion in a professional work environment. You will be asked to do some calculations so please bring a calculator.

Published: 2016

Research and journals

Why bother with accessibility

Presented at Clarity2016. A presentation by Disabled Person’s Organisation People First New Zealand Ltd. Ngā Tāngata Tuatahi and the Donald Beasley Institute (DBI), an independent charitable trust that conducts research in the area of learning disability.

In the first part of the session Alexia Black, Manager of People First’s Easy Read Translation Service, will discuss the case for creating and using accessible formats for legal documents and information. The presentation will begin with a look at the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – with a particular focus on Articles:

9 – Accessibility (of information)
12 – Equal recognition before the Law
13 – Access to Justice.

The talk will introduce the audience to the concept and practicalities of working with Disabled Persons Organisations, and share learnings from the organisation’s journey to create:

- the world’s first Easy Read Individual Employment Agreement
- New Zealand’s first Easy Read Will.

In the second part of the session, Alexia will be joined by Dr Brigit Mirfin-Veitch (Director of the Donald Beasley Institute). The DBI is committed to achieving social change through transformative research. Ensuring that people with learning disability have access to research findings is one important step in this process. Brigit will describe how she has engaged with People First New Zealand Ngā Tāngata Tuatahi in the context of research, and will specifically draw on a recent project concerned with the experiences of people with learning disability in the legal system.

Published: 2016

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This page was last updated on August 17, 2016